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animal welfare

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  16 comments for “animal welfare

  1. Olivia Mayer
    04/02/2014 at 3:10 pm

    It looks fantastic!!!

    Am not sure that the distinction between ‘current affairs’ and ‘public interest’ is that clear though.. (what is the difference?).

    Apart from that, am loving it so far!

    • 10/01/2017 at 8:19 pm

      I’ve been lonoikg for a post like this for an age

  2. Ivy Wright
    04/02/2014 at 3:26 pm

    I also think it might be a good idea to make it clear that the ‘name’ field, when leaving a comment or whatever, will be one’s name as it appears on the blog.. so it doesn’t have to be someone’s real name.

    • endorseric
      04/02/2014 at 6:17 pm

      Good point!

      • 10/01/2017 at 8:15 pm

        Posts like this brihetgn up my day. Thanks for taking the time.

  3. Judarella
    08/02/2014 at 1:21 pm

    Good site. Keep it going. Love a chance to vent my opinions

  4. 13/02/2014 at 2:54 am

    I enjoy, result in I found just what I used to be looking for. You’ve ended my four day long hunt! God Bless you man. Have a nice day. Bye
    [url=http://www.nikeslove.com/]

  5. 10/05/2014 at 12:25 pm

    Unfortunately we have been very busy on matters not related to this blog. We hope in a few weeks time to be posting more frequently and more regularly.

  6. 03/07/2014 at 10:03 pm

    Nice blog here! Also your web site loads up very fast!
    What host are you using? Can I get your affiliate link to your host?
    I wish my site loaded up as quickly as yours lol

  7. 25/08/2014 at 7:12 am

    Tasmanian anti-environment protest laws back before Parliament

    Tasmania’s upper house of Parliament will soon debate proposed laws that create new offences for conducting protests in a manner that disrupt business activities, including conducting protests on business premises or that impede access to the location for business activities.

    The Workplaces (Protection from Protestors) Bill 2014 passed the Tasmanian lower house in late June 2014. On 19 August 2014 it was read for the first time in the Tasmanian Legislative Council. The Bill continues to generate protest and opposition from within parliament and beyond. The proposed bill creates new definitions of protest and business that, should the bill pass, will be much analysed by judges. However, as Melbourne Law School’s Professor Adrienne Stone has noted, the law may ultimately be subject to a constitutional challenge on the ground that it is inconsistent with the implied constitutional freedom of political communication. The limitation on protestors might be unreasonable or disproportionate to the desired purpose of the law – to protect businesses from disruption. Should a challenge to the law be brought before the High Court, it will add to the opportunities presented to the court last year in the cases of Monis and Corneloup and already this year in the Unions NSW case to develop jurisprudence on the implied freedom.

  8. Sara Stanley
    25/08/2014 at 7:51 am

    Thanks Brad for raising this attempt of Tasmania to turn itself into the Queensland of yesteryear. Apparently the members of the House of Assembly, the effects of climate change must be having rather an impact in Tasmania.

    When i previously heard of this pending pice of legislation, it was reported to be carrying penalties for unlawful assembly that are more punitive than those determined for child abuse in Tasmania.

  9. climatic
    26/08/2014 at 1:46 pm

    Apparently the Chinese are leading the world in reducing emmissions to help reduce climate change.

  10. 01/09/2014 at 8:45 am

    Scores of manufacturing jobs in Ballarat – which covers two of Victoria’s most marginal seats – are under threat after a local train builder was quietly culled from the shortlist to make 25 new trains for Melbourne.
    Two Asian rail giants remain in the bidding to build the trains, putting about 70 jobs in Ballarat under threat.

  11. 03/09/2014 at 7:30 am

    From The Age a quote from an article by Tim Flannery, Chief Councillor of the Climate Council of Australia and Fiona Stanley who is a Distinguished Research Professor, School of Paediatrics and Child Health at the University of Western Australia, and a Vice-Chancellor’s Fellow at the University of Melbourne.
    QUOTE
    ‘The real cost of electricity from coal on health, the environment and future generations must be considered. And with mounting scientific evidence and positive developments by the global powers – it is time for coal’s human health risks to be embedded in all energy and resources policy and investment decisions in Australia. The nation should be switching to cleaner, healthier energy options, such as wind and solar power. Weakening or scrapping the Renewable Energy Target, in favour of dirty coal is not the way forward.
    Today, we released a joint statement urgently calling for consistent air, water and soil quality monitoring at and around every coal mine and power station in Australia. This monitoring should be paid for by the coal industry and overseen by an independent authority. And adequate funding should be allocated for research to evaluate the health, social and environmental impacts of coal in these coal mining communities, and more broadly, across Australia.
    Ultimately, why should Australia ask its workers and communities near coal mines and power plants to pay for our electricity with their health?’

    • 10/01/2017 at 5:07 pm

      Your articles are for when it aboeultsly, positively, needs to be understood overnight.

  12. 26/06/2015 at 1:19 pm

    This cattegory has been changed to animal welfare. Some of the comments left here relate to an earlier version of humble comment.info.

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