humble comment

letters to newspapers

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather

  4 comments for “letters to newspapers

  1. Letter to the age
    06/02/2014 at 11:27 am

    Dear Santa, I well understand how busy you must be. I would not write this letter but I need your help, you see. I do not ask for presents though that is fine with me. I ask that those in charge of us, whoever they may be, get from you the precious gift of public decency. It’s said we get the government, the rulers we deserve. I certainly don’t vote for them – I wouldn’t have the nerve. So why should I put up with them now that they’re in control? That’s why I am suggesting that it’s time you play a role. Give them integrity and truth, openness and good will – such are the gifts with which their stockings you should fill.
    I know the things I’ve mentioned are in very short supply, which is the motivation for giving this a try. If you need help with wrapping gifts to make them look attractive, then you may get some help from the politically active. I’m sure your maps are up to date but just in case they’re not: Parliament House has no chimneys but Kirribilli has a lot. Best regards, dear Santa, and thanks for your attention. Please bless our special Christmas wish with your kind intervention.

    • Letter to the age
      06/02/2014 at 11:39 am

      Dear blogger thank you for your letter. It came too late to make things better. The Sunday Age – they did not publish because they dubbed your letter rubbish. It came to me, although not sent, too late to influence parliament. While your request is hardly seasonable there is no doubt it’s not unreasonable. However you must understand they’re rules for me that He has planned. I’m limited while on the go to utterances like ‘Ho Ho Ho!’ I can distribute lots of toys to undeserving girls and boys and jingle bells and drive a sleigh but when it comes to things that may affect what politicians do the foot is in the other shoe. However I will do my best to implement what you request although it is against the rules, but rules, of course, are just for fools. Meanwhile best wishes to you all from Santa, 999, North Pole

  2. 28/06/2015 at 9:04 am

    Letter toThe Age 28/6/15 by Brian Moynihan of Castlemain,Victoeia.

    I have no idea who will win the next federal election, but I know who will lose it; the voters. Tony Abbott who sells his policies to the big end of town, Mr Shorten, a career union leader, sold his union to Winslow Constructions. If he is the best the Labor Party has to offer as the next PM, we have to look beyond the major parties. and his party isn’t nice. He breaks promises and does silly things like making the Queen’s husband a knight. His government’s budgets look after the wealthy and take from the less well off. But what about Opposition Leader Bill Shorten? Reports about his trade union past and how he became Opposition Leader suggest we voters have little hope for principled leadership.
    In my working life I was both a rank and file member and an employed union officer. The fundamental principles all unionists held was that the union belonged to the members, not the leaders and definitely not to the employers. Not unlike Mr Abbott, who sells his policies to the big end of town, Mr Shorten, a career union leader, sold his union to
    Winslow Constructions. If he is the best the Labor Party has to offer as the next PM, we have to look beyond the
    major parties.

  3. 07/07/2016 at 2:23 pm

    Letter to the Australian Financial Review 5/7/16 by Gale Treadgold, Burradoo, NSW

    Condemnation of Labor’s campaign against ‘privatisation’ of medicare is definitely disingenuous and arguably dishonest in itself.

    It is clearly reasonable to describe policies of the Coalition that involve fading cuts, co-payments and removal of items from cover under Medicare as ‘privatisation’.

    The eminent professor of Sociology and Public Affairs at Princeton University, Paul Star, author of ‘ The peculiar American Struggle over Health Care Reform‘, said in his article ‘The Meaning of Privatisation’, that it can include all reductions in the regulatory and spending activity of the state’.

    In the pantheon of misleading political campaigns, Medicare privatisation has to rank behind calling carbon pricing a ‘tax’.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *